Does Proxy Voting Work for Non-Profits?

The recent remaking of the non-profit corporate law statutes has cemented the concept of proxy voting into the lives of non-profit and charitable organizations.  So it’s time that you familiarize yourself with proxy voting if you haven’t before.  Proxy voting is a mechanism for a member of a voting body to delegate his or her voting right to another person.  In the context of nonprofit corporations on this side of the 49th parallel, voting bodies do not include the board of directors, only the members.  Our friends to the south allow directors in various states this luxury as well.  I would suggest that is fraught with danger, but that’s a topic for another day. 

Legal Matters - Corporate Law

Thinking of Taking on a Business Partner?

Senior Care Home Negligence

Question:

My elderly mother lives in a nursing home. Due to the neglect of the staff she fell and fractured her hip. What can I do?

CPP Disability Beneftis

Question:
I have been working as a clerk for 12 years and recently became stricken with breast cancer. I am unable to work. I have no disability insurance coverage through work. My doctor told me to apply for Canada Pension Plan Disability (CPP) Benefits.   I have never heard of CPP Disability benefits. What are they?
 

PTSD and Disability Claims

Question.:
I have been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder due to a traumatic event. Do I have a legal case?

 

A Word on Ex-Officio Directors

In the business world it is common place for businesses to operate through multiple legal entities.  Interestingly, the non-profit world has not embraced these strategies in the same way.  We represent many established and growing non-profit and charitable organizations and many of them expand into new territories or cross national borders to scale their operations to meet demands. From time to time they will ask how best to structure their organizations to accommodate growth.  The answer, like many, is never straight forward.  One legal size rarely fits all organizations.  Some lawyers or consultants decide upon on the ideal structure for any organization and then they impose that vision on every one of their clients.  This mindset is unfortunately reinforced by model documents that on can find on-line or distributed by government bodies.  Handle these with care. 
 

Power of Attorney Abuse

The Superior Court of Justice has reminded us that people caring for their aging parents need to remember that no matter how well meaning they may intend to be, the money manage is strictly for the welfare of their parents and not themselves.

Legal Matters - Real Estate


Question:
Who qualifies for the Provincial Land Transfer Tax Rebate?
 

Legal Matters - Human Rights

I need to take time off work or require changes in my workplace because of my disability. What information can my employer ask me for?

One Size Does Not Fit All Organizations When It Comes to Legal Structures

In the business world it is common place for businesses to operate through multiple legal entities.  Interestingly, the non-profit world has not embraced these strategies in the same way.  We represent many established and growing non-profit and charitable organizations and many of them expand into new territories or cross national borders to scale their operations to meet demands. From time to time they will ask how best to structure their organizations to accommodate growth.  The answer, like many, is never straight forward.  One legal size rarely fits all organizations.  Some lawyers or consultants decide upon on the ideal structure for any organization and then they impose that vision on every one of their clients.  This mindset is unfortunately reinforced by model documents that on can find on-line or distributed by government bodies.  Handle these with care.