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Brad J. Wiseman

905.572.5828


bwiseman@rossmcbride.com

Year of call: 2005

Brad is a litigation lawyer and Partner with Ross & McBride LLP.

He graduated from the faculty of law at the University of Ottawa in 2004 and obtained two Bachelor of Arts degrees from McMaster University and an Honour's degree from the University of Ottawa, prior to entering law school.

In addition, Brad has completed a comprehensive course in alternative dispute resolution.

His practice focuses on Estate Litigation.

Brad has appeared at all levels of Court in Ontario, including the Court of Appeal, and has successfully defended an Application for Leave to Appeal to the Supreme Court of Canada.


Areas of Expertise

  • Litigation
  • Estates

Organizations and Activities

  • Law Society of Upper Canada (Admitted)
  • Canadian Bar Association (Member)
  • Ontario Bar Association (Member)
  • Hamilton Law Association (Member)
  • Advocates Society (Member)
  • Autism Ontario (Member)
  • Canadian Williams Syndrome Association (Member)

Related Articles

Can I claim support from an estate?

Ontario’s Succession Law Reform Act provides that a “dependent” can claim support from an Estate.
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What happens if I can't find the original Will?

Generally speaking, an original Will is required for the Court to issue a Certificate of Appointment of Estate Trustee (formerly called “probate”); and even where probate is not necessarily required, a deceased person’s financial institutions will likely require the original Will or a notarial copy.
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Can I be disinherited by a Will on the basis of discrimination?

Generally speaking, a person has the “testamentary freedom” to do what he wants with his Estate upon death, though there are some limits on that freedom owing to public policy concerns, and potentially including blatant discrimination.

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